Posts

emergency services

All Clear Septic Consulting and Emergency Services

CONSULTING & EMERGENCY SERVICES

In addition to Title 5 Inspections, septic repairs and cleaning services, All-Clear also provides professional consultations to property owners, both residential and commercial.

We understand that most septic problems don’t occur between 9am and 5pm Monday through Friday, so we also offer 24/7 emergency services to our customers. We’ll be there when you need us anytime of day or night.

CONSULTING SERVICES

Do you have a difficult septic problem? Have you called other services that were unable to solve your issues? All-Clear can help to answer all of your septic related questions and help you find solutions that will get your septic system back on track and running properly. We utilize state-of-the-art equipment that can help us to quickly identify and accurately pinpoint the problems that are plaguing your system. At All-Clear, questions are always FREE. Give us a call at 508-763-4431 to ask a question, call us out for a consultation or set up an appointment for an evaluation or inspection.

EMERGENCY SERVICES

Our professional team of licensed and certified technicians are on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Just call our Emergency Service Center day or night at 508-763-4431 and we will send someone out to take care of your emergency septic problems right away.

All-Clear also offers a Preventative Maintenance Program that can help you stay on top of your septic system to prevent emergency situations in the future. Ask one of our team members about the various programs available for our customers.

Visit www.allclearseptic.com to answer any of your septic needs.

drain cleaner

Drain Cleaner and Onsite Systems Are a Bad Combination

drain cleanerPublished in Onsite Installer Magazine

www.onsiteinstaller.com

Written by Sarah Heger

Chemicals used in many drain cleaners kill the essential bacteria needed by septic systems.


Septic systems rely on natural bacteria to treat wastewater. Harsh chemicals used in many drain cleaners kill the essential bacteria needed by septic systems.

Chemical drain cleaners are among the most dangerous of all cleaning products to human health. Most contain corrosive ingredients such as sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide (lye) and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) that can permanently burn eyes and skin. Some can be fatal if ingested. Cleaning products are required by law to include label warnings if harmful ingredients are included which are:

Signal word Toxicity if swallowed, inhaled or absorbed through the skin
Caution One ounce to one pint may be harmful
Warning One teaspoon to one ounce may be harmful or fatal
Danger One taste to one teaspoon is fatal
Ideally, the products used on all our homes either have no warning or only a “Caution.”

In a study by Gross (1987), a lab study found significant decreases in concentrations of coliform bacteria at very low Drano concentrations. Just 0.1 mg of Drano per liter of septic tank effluent reduced the concentration of coliforms tenfold; 1.3 mg is enough to kill most bacteria, and at 3 mg/L they are destroyed. Three mg/L corresponds to 11.3 grams in a 1,000-gallon septic tank. Also, there was as a slight decrease in pH at higher concentrations of Drano. This amount could possibly be used by a homeowner in a short time period when unclogging a drain. The bacteria population recovers to its original concentration within 48 hours following the addition of the Drano.

Alternatives for customers
Prevent drains from becoming blocked in the first place by having really good catch basins in all drains from sinks, showers, tubs, laundry, etc. This is easily done with inexpensive metal or plastic drain screens. Large food scraps, along with fat, oils and grease should be collected and disposed of with the solid waste or composted when possible, and not dumped down the drain.

The most likely spot for a sink drain to clog is about 6 inches below the drain opening in the trap. If a clog occurs, many times the plumbing under a sink can be removed and manually cleaned. In other instances a plunger may also help to clear the obstruction or a drain auger or snake is used to manually remove the material causing the slow or blocked drain. If the blockage isn’t near enough to the sink to reach with a snake, look for other places to gain entry to the pipe. There should be clean-out ports that can be unscrewed to gain access to pipes for auguring. If it’s a tough hair or scale-type clog, it may be worth it to call in a professional with better equipment to handle those types of blockages.

As a last resort, chemical drain cleaners may be used, but they must be enzyme-based rather than caustic cleaners. Earth Friendly or Naturally Yours are two brands of enzyme-based drain cleaners. Homeowners can  make their own: Put 1/2 cup salt,  1/2 cup baking soda, 6 cups of vinegar down the drain.  Let stand for an hour or so & then pour kettle of boiling water down your  drain. This can be done every 6 months to a year.  It does no damage and can help to keep drains clear.

All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services can answer all your septic questions.  Call them at 508-763-4431 or visit www.allclearseptic.com

good septic owner

Top 10 Ways to Be a Good Septic Owner

septic system tipsAccording to the EPA , here are the top 10 ways to be a good septic owner.

Have your system inspected every three years by a qualified professional or according to your state/ local health department’s recommendations.

Have your septic tank pumped, when necessary, generally every three to five years.

Avoid pouring harsh products (e.g., oils, grease, chemicals, paint, medications) down the drain.

Discard non-degradable products in the trash (e.g., floss, disposable wipes, cat litter) instead of flushing them.

Keep cars and heavy vehicles parked away from the drainfield and tank.

Repair leaks and use water efficient fixtures to avoid overloading the system.

Space out water usage throughout the week.  e.g. spread loads of laundry throughout the week  and avoid excessive washing on one particular day.

Maintain plants and vegetation near the system to ensure roots do not block drains.

Use soaps and detergents that are low-suds, biodegradable, and low- or phosphate-free.

Prevent system freezing during cold weather by inspecting and insulating vulnerable system parts (e.g., the inspection pipe and soil treatment area).

Another great idea,  call All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services and enroll in their maintenance program.  They can keep you on schedule with regular maintenance to keep your system functioning properly and avoid costly repairs.     You can reach them at 508-763-4431 or visit www.allclearseptic.com.

RASEM Red Expo

All Clear Septic and Wastewater at RASEM Red Expo

RASEM Red ExpoAll Clear Septic and Wastewater Services was at the RASEM Red Expo in Raynham last week.  Al Rivet and Liz Alves of All Clear were on hand to answer any questions on septic services.  Al participated in the RED Talks and spoke of all the services All Clear Septic and Septic Preservation had to offer to consumers.  These include Title 5 Septic Inspections, septic functional inspections, septic repairs, septic system assessments, septic maintenance, cleaning and pumping to name a few.  He also talked about the Realtor loyalty program All Clear and Septic Preservation offer to local realtors when they refer a client.  He was able to provide many tips for keeping a healthy septic system and avoiding  a septic system failure.  The talk was very interesting and informative and he and Liz were on hand to any clients or realtors with more information on all the services they provide.  Call Septic Preservation with any of your septic system questions at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com
RASEM Red Expo

education

All Clear Septic Dedicated to Keeping Customers Informed

education

Septic Systems make suburban living possible.  There are many areas which are not serviced by a municipal sewage system and therefore a private septic system is the answer.  Many people who have grown up in the city and decide to make the move out to “the sticks” are not familiar at all with a private septic system.  Once homeowners realize how a septic system and its components operate, they can better understand how to keep it functioning properly.

There are many do’s and don’ts on how to maintain your septic system, whether it be what not to put down your toilet and drains, or cleaners that may be harmful to your system.

All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services is proud to offer educational videos and papers to help home owners better understand their septic systems and how to keep it functioning properly.  Visit www.allclearseptic.com and click on the links to view information to better help you understand your septic system as well as tips for everyday living or water usage as well as cleaning products and additives.  Click on the Septic systems 101 for education links as well as FAQ.

All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services also offers a maintenance program to help keep your septic system functioning properly as well as technicians who will answer any questions you may have.

Call 508-763-4431 to speak to an All Clear professional and have all your questions answered or for an appointment for a septic evaluation. We are here to help.

 

gardens

Gardens and Septic Systems

gardensCountry living is a great  lifestyle for many people. While planning gardens and orchards, there are certain things you need to keep in mind.   For example, most country homes require a septic system for disposal of sewage. While septic systems are fairly efficient, the leach field is an essential element in processing and dispersing the waste water. Because of the possibility of bacteria in the soil, only grass, shallow-rooted flowers, bulbs and meadow grasses are planted directly over the septic system. You should never plant fruits or vegetables on or near a leach field.

How do you locate the septic system?   A  septic plot plan  is always  filed with the local Board of Health in Massachusetts, DEM in Rhode Island, New Hampshire DES, and Plumbing Code Enforcement in Maine.   Visit your appropriate agency  to obtain a copy of your septic system.  Measure and mark the perimeter with landscaper’s spray paint. While new construction requires a plot plan, older homes may not have any documents available to indicate the location of the septic tank and leach lines.

2

Locate the sewer lines leading away from the house. There may be a clean-out, risers or manhole cover indicating the location of the septic tank. Generally, the septic tank is located approximately 10 to 15 feet away from from the house.

3

Probe with a metal rod, pushing it gently into the ground to locate the gravel drain field. The leach lines usually are 6 to 18 inches below the surface of the soil. Work your way out and away from the house. As you find the perimeter of the drain field, mark it with landscaper’s spray paint.

4

Measure 10 feet from the outer perimeter of the leach field. Mark the garden’s borders with stakes.    Fruits and vegetables should be planted at least 10 feet from a septic system or leach field to avoid bacterial contamination.

5

Prepare a landscape plan before planting shrubs or trees near a leach field. Non-aggressive shrubs and trees should be planted at a distance equal to the mature height of the plant. Trees with aggressive roots, such as a willow tree, should be planted at least 50 feet from a leach field.

Septic Preservation  can answer all your questions on your septic system and help you with all your septic needs throughout New England. They can be reached at 877-678-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

septic system odors

The History of the Septic System

Homeowners who have septic systems in Sagamore or anywhere else in the United States, owe a debt of gratitude to John Mouras. Mouras is believed to be the inventor of the modern septic tank system.

The history of the septic system begins on or around the year 1860 in France. Mouras designed a basic septic tank and created a prototype that was made out of concrete. He created piping that was made out of clay, which he then used to remove water waste from his home out to the septic tank that he placed in his yard.

Mouras then dismantled the unit some ten years later and was amazed to discover that the tank he had created was virtually empty of any solid waste and only contained a layer of liquid effluent scum. He was so impressed with the results that he submitted an application to patent his invention. He was granted a patent in the year 1881. By 1883, the septic tank began to appear throughout the United States.

Simple, Genius Construction
The standard septic tank typically holds anywhere between 1,000 to 2,000 gallons of waste and waste water. There are usually two to three openings available for inspection, one inlet opening that comes from the house or building, and an outlet that goes to the distribution box.

Not all septic systems have distribution boxes, however the ones that do use it as a junction between the septic tank and the drainfield. Distribution boxes help to evenly distribute the effluent material to the drainfield for the final stage of processing.

Inside the septic system there are three layers of waste: the top scum layer, the bottom sludge layer and the liquid layer that lies in between. The liquid layer is also known as the effluent layer. Systems that are not properly maintained will be impacted by the effluent layer, which is what seeps through the top of the drainfield or back into the home or building during failure.

The Drainfield
The modern drainfield is based on Mouras’ original design and is usually made up of 4 inch perforated pipe that runs anywhere between 10′ to 100 feet or more in length from the distribution box or septic tank. This perforated pipe is buried underneath the soil anywhere between two and six feet beneath the surface.

The pipe is layered in gravel that is typically made of 1 1/2″ to 1 3/4″ stone. The waste water travels through the perforated pipe and is then absorbed into the drainfield for a final filtering process.

Septic System Maintenance in Massachusetts
It is important for homeowners and business owners that rely upon a septic system to know about proper septic system maintenance in Massachusetts, or wherever you happen to live. The amount of maintenance required for your particular set-up will depend greatly upon your usage of the system and the condition of the equipment itself.

A septic tank system is designed to effectively accommodate the number of people that live in the home or regularly work in a commercial or industrial building.    Proper preventative maintenance, which includes annual check-ups by a certified technician, should also be done to prevent problems or issues that can arise.

Homeowners with septic systems  in Southeastern Massachusetts, Eastern Rhode Island or anywhere in the United States who neglect proper system maintenance could experience dangerous levels of sludge which prevent proper separation of solids, liquid and scum. When this occurs, overflow can migrate into the drainfield and cause thousands of dollars in damage and repairs.

Professional septic system maintenance in Massachusetts involves regular check-ups to ensure the proper break down of solids through the septic tank system to ensure a safe and healthy process. The volume of waste water flow in your system is determined by the type of household activities, such as washing dishes, doing laundry and taking showers, as well as the frequency of those activities.   Water conservation is very important  to limit the strain on your systemv and help keep it  in good working condition.

Get Started Today
Homeowners and commercial customers can get started on preventative septic system maintenance in Massachusetts, eastern Rhode Island or out on the Cape, just by calling Septic Preservation Servies. Located in Norton.  Septic Preservation Services services customers all over Massachusetts. Contact them today for information on preventative services, repairs, inspections and other septic system related services.   You can reach them at 877-678-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com